Archive for Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Oh, deer

Sheriff’s office gives tips as deer season wanes

Deer numbers have mushroomed in western Shawnee, and police were concerned last week after finding signs of illegal hunting. The increase in deer numbers is readily apparent to anyone who visits Shawnee Mission Park around dawn or dusk, although park police said there has been no evidence of poaching, or illegal hunting, there. This doe skipped nonchalantly across one of the park roads a few minutes before sundown Monday.

Deer numbers have mushroomed in western Shawnee, and police were concerned last week after finding signs of illegal hunting. The increase in deer numbers is readily apparent to anyone who visits Shawnee Mission Park around dawn or dusk, although park police said there has been no evidence of poaching, or illegal hunting, there. This doe skipped nonchalantly across one of the park roads a few minutes before sundown Monday.

December 9, 2009

Lt. Mark D. Metcalf, patrol division commander with the Leavenworth County Sheriff's Office, discusses ways Leavenworth County residents can stay safe as deer season comes to a close.

Q: How has this year’s deer rutting season compared with previous years?

A: Our accident count involving deer is normal for this time of year, while I expect to start seeing a decrease now that the rut is ending.

Q: Is there a time of the day where there is more deer activity?

A: The deer tend to be more active during dawn, dusk and the overnight hours.

Q; Are there any places where there is more activity from deer than any other?

A: I have not seen an area of Leavenworth County where we tend to see higher accident counts contributed to deer.

Q: What can people do to remain safe?

A: To remain safe, wear your seatbelt and slow down. Watch the ditches and field edges and look for movement in these areas.

Q: Is there anything people shouldn’t do when encountering a deer in the road?

A: While it is normal for people to swerve when trying to avoid a deer, remember there can be oncoming traffic or if you swerve toward the ditch there can be large trees, culverts, etc. All of which, if impacted, can do more damage and people can sustain more injury.

The Kansas Department of Transportation states that deer mating season generally peaks in November, but continues into December.

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