Archive for Thursday, July 29, 2021

Heat advisory extended to Friday evening

The swimming pool long has been a place where people go to beat the summer heat. With summer officially here, temperatures in the 90s and the heat index into the 100 range, the National Red Cross warns people of dangers of heat and how to beat it.

The swimming pool long has been a place where people go to beat the summer heat. With summer officially here, temperatures in the 90s and the heat index into the 100 range, the National Red Cross warns people of dangers of heat and how to beat it.

July 29, 2021

The current heat advisory that includes the Tonganoxie area has been extended another day.

Leavenworth and Jefferson counties are among portions of northeast Kansas in a heat advisory that has been extended a day. It now is set to expire at 9 p.m. Friday. Heat index values are between 105 and 110 degrees today and are expected to be near 105 Friday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service.

East central, central and southeast Kansas also are in the National Weather Service advisory, as are parts of Missouri.

The temperature was 98 degrees just before 5 p.m. today as Leavenworth County Fair Week continues in Tonganoxie. The heat wave continues across the state and region. Salina was at 102 and Hays at 100.

Hot temperatures and high humidity levels may cause illnesses to occur in the coming days.

The National Weather Service reminds residents to drink ample amounts of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned rooms, stay out of the sun and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any circumstances.

The advisory also reminds people living in the advisory areas to take extra precautions if they work or spend time outside.

When possible, area residents should:

• Reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. People also should:

• Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

• Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when possible.

To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments.

Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. If it’s thought that someone has heat stroke, bystanders should call 911.

The extreme temperatures and subsequent safety tips also provide good reminders to monitor pets and animals to ensure they aren’t out in the hot elements and overheating during the summer extremes.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.